Feminist Hacker Barbie

MattelĀ® released "Barbie: I Can Be A Computer Engineer" back in 2013. It was apparently the most sexist Barbie book ever. Barbie is totally incompetent - she infects her and a friend's computer with viruses, only makes the "designs" for a game and relies on male friends to code it, and then takes all the credit for the eventual game.

It made waves this week; somehow people only noticed it now. Mashable did a great writeup, and the book got hundreds of one-star reviews on Amazon before being de-listed. The internet continues to rag on it via the #FeministHackerBarbie hashtag, taking pages out of the book and re-captioning them.

I am seriously cracking up. Here's one of my favorites via Livelyivy:

#FeministHackerBarbie

There's also a tool for making your own version, and it's great. Here's mine:

#VertexShaderBarbie

WYSIWYG is a disaster

I've been trying to find a good WYSIWYG editor for simple CMS I'm building. My project just needs to make static pages - you know, /about, /faq, etc. The idea was that even if a developer had to write the HTML, anyone could go in and fix a typo or add a paragraph. My requirements for the html editor were pretty simple, I thought:

  • Produces mostly clean HTML (no <font>, <span style="ugly: yes;">, etc )
  • Forces Word, RTF, and HTML paste into plaintext, or at least something not horrible
  • Assigns classes for p, h1, hr, etc (or has hooks so I can add it in)
  • In-place editing mode
  • Minimal dependencies

Of course, you can't just use contentEditable directly. The Guardian has a great run-down of inconsistencies they found while building their back-end.

As has ever been the case, there are dozens of js libraries to do this sort of thing, and figuring out which ones are even worth investigating is a huge and draining process. Unfortunately my go-to for this sort of thing was out. Readactor is excellent, with a good API, good documentation, and readable code. But it's not free, and I want to release this as open-source.

  • TinyMCE - I got burned badly enough by this back in the PHP era
  • CKEditor - if anyone can show me a list of configuration options and their variations for this beast, I'll be impressed. A list of events I can hook into, and I'll be stunned. Some of the worst documentation I've ever dealt with. And look at the freakin' Rails plugin - better hope you use CanCan, Pundit, Mongoid, and want to slap in an extra controller.
  • WYMeditor - sounds interesting, but the mid-90's design isn't inspiring
  • Etch - backbone
  • Summernote - bootstrap
  • jQuery Text Editor - bare bones, and kinda crap docs
  • Hallo - links plugin isn't working. wut?
  • SmallEditor - angular
  • jQuery Notebook - can't even guess what requirements this will / won't need from reading the page and the docs - also needs font-awesome
  • Trumbowyg - wtf is with that name? "semantic" option is still in alpha
  • Morrigan - their demo page has scantly clad women! This must be a great editor! Yes, I played Dragon Age as well, but come on. Also v0.1-beta
  • Azexo Composer - drag and drop Bootstrap components, not quite what I wanted
  • Aloha Editor - beautiful page, but it really doesn't tell me a damn thing about how to use it, and their API docs are nil
  • Medium.js - no support for messing with classes or styles in the content
  • Scribe - not an editor, but a toolkit for building one. Built as AMD js modules, distributed via Bower, and everything is a plugin. Try building on this in a Rails engine, and you're gonna have a bad time.

The bottom line is that WYSIWYG editors for HTML are awful, and have been ever since Dreamweaver. I never thought about why it was an impossible concept until I read Nick Santos' article about Medium's editor.

Now I'm trying to figure out if I should accept an ugly, duct-taped-together interface for my CMS or just screw it and use Markdown.

Post-checkout hooks for rails

Other post-checkout hooks try to auto-run migrations or bundling for you, but I feel like those are pretty error-prone. On the other hand, just getting notified is pretty helpful.

Copy + paste into project/.git/hooks/post-checkout

How to Profile a Leaky Sidekiq Job in Heroku - Happy Bootstrapper

Very helpful. Difficulty not addressed: load testing in production.

Javascript - the style is the substance

Javascript is an interesting language. While Ruby has a style guide, and Python has a few (including Google's, they are not critical to how your code functions. They just help avoid those "strip whitespace" commits that touch every line in your repo and permanently ruin git blame.

With Javascript, the style is the substance. Take these two for example:

var object = {
    method: function(data){ ... },
    _variable: 3
};

object2 = {
    method: function(datae){ ... },
    _variable: 2
}

var Klass = function(){
    this.method = function(data){ ... };
    this.variable = 4;
    return this;
}

These seemingly small differences might not affect how a short script works, but they are critical to how your app works as a whole. The first declares a single object. The second declares a global variable. The third declares effectively a factory function.

Newlines can result in syntax errors for strings. Missing semicolons can ruin your JS after compression. Using reserved words as object keys can break your code in some browsers. Failing to use === can result in unexpected behavior.

It is essential to use a Javascript style guide. Frameworks like Express and Angular can help standardize things like object and module declarations, and CoffeeScript can provide syntax sugar to cover simple issues.

Otherwise, AirBnB's style guide is comprehensive and helps show best practices. Pick something, and stick with it, especially if you are working on a team.

Ruby Operators

This is funny XD

=>    hashrocket
<=>   spaceship
~>    twiddlewaka
->    stabby lambda

Time zone junk

Some random things I built to help deal with timezones in Ruby / JS

Update: Extracted this into a gem (in beta): HappyTime

Fair random numbers in ruby

Finally! A way to get a truly, really random number in Ruby. Forget rand(), messings with seeds, etc. This gem uses the real thing - true randomness. Amazing.

Ruby String Remove Formatting

String#remove_formatting , from the StringEx library. Gets rid of unicode griefer chars, html entities, basically any BS you can think of.

This function is THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST THE BEST

Tcm Aphrodite Funkagenda

Holy crap, this is next Saturday

Who's going?

The Crystal Method

Aphrodite

Yes, he still makes music.

Funkagenda